What Does Addiction Do to Family?

When one person is going through something, their whole family goes through it with them. This is the same for addiction. When a loved one is struggling with addiction, it’s almost like the whole family has that struggle. Even if family members aren’t close, addiction can be a serious detriment to the family. Addiction is a family disease.

Watching someone go through such a terrible thing as addiction is a struggle in of itself, but things can happen to the family at the same time. It’s important to know what can come your way so that you can keep your family united and strong.

Addiction can pull family members apart.

Addiction happens, and sometimes it’s unexpected. Family members may feel disappointment, anger, and fear. These emotions can cause distress and ultimately pull families apart. That doesn’t have to happen, though. Allow the addiction to be a reason to unite and support one another.

Addiction can create distrust.

With families comes an innate sense of trust. You expect to love, support, and trust each other. Addiction may often ruin that trust. If this happens, work to build it up again. Work together, keep communication open, and be frank in what it will take to create those bonds of trust again.

Addiction can put pressure on finances.

Jobs may be lost as addiction comes into the lives of a family. The addict may find that they stopped going to work and ultimately lost a job. You may be in danger of losing a house or being kicked out of an apartment. The addiction has not only affected the well-being of the person but the well-being of the whole family. This is just yet another reason to get the help needed to recover so that finances can recover, and ultimately help the family recover.

Addiction can become a daily problem for all family members.

Addiction is not merely a bad habit; it’s something that is preventing your loved one from behaving normally and living their life as they would sober. This can become a forefront thought for all family members, as they go to work, or to school, or do anything. It can affect how the whole family behaves and may even cause depression. This is why the right steps need to be taken to cure the addiction, to recover from it.

Do not enable your loved one. Don’t give them money, but give them food and a place to stay. Seek out help. Research recovery programs so that your loved one can get the appropriate help. Do the research needed to make sure you are giving the appropriate support to your family member.

As it says right on our home page, “We’re here to help. We offer quality centers with experienced staff members who can give you and your family the tools for sober living.” You can learn more about our steps to recovery here.